Opening April 3, 2019 for the 103rd Season!

Speaker Series: Patricia Violette Explores Colonial-Native Treaties

The Woodman Museum announces its first Speaker Series event of 2019, “Diplomacy in Early New England: Treaty Conferences as a Window on Native and Non-Native Cultures,” to be held on February 20 at 7:00 PM. Tickets are $5 for non-members and free for members.
The event kicks off the 2019 Speaker Series to be hosted at the Woodman Museum, featuring talks on period Seacoast furniture, slavery and capitalism in America, John Wilkes Booth, oceanography, New Hampshire’s participation in the Revolutionary War, and other historical and special topics.
Guest speaker Patricia Violette will deliver a talk on relations between colonists and indigenous tribes in the mid-18th century, exploring the ramifications of treaties forged between native groups in New England and colonial governments. Violette will recount the actions of Royal Governor William Shirley, who served as Captain-General (Commander-in-Chief) of Massachusetts forces during two wars: King George’s War, 1744 to 1748, and the French and Indian War, 1754 to 1763. Though most of the fighting in both wars took place in Europe, each also resulted in Massachusetts declaring war on the Indian tribes on its Eastern frontier in Maine. European treaties ended the fighting on the continent, but Massachusetts also signed separate treaties with the Indians, either to end the hostilities or to gain Indian permission for an expansion of Massachusetts military presence in the Kennebec River valley.
Using the transcripts of three treaty conferences conducted by Shirley, Patricia Violette, Executive Director of Albacore Park Museum and Visitor Center in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, will compare key English and Indian cultural concepts, examine selected exchanges in the transcripts for cultural clues, and discuss why cultural differences made it so hard for Natives and non-Natives to achieve lasting peace.
Ms. Patricia Violette has more than twenty years of experience in nonprofit management and museum leadership, including Old Fort Western in Augusta, Maine; the Shirley-Eustis Historic House in Boston, Massachusetts, Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum in Warner, New Hampshire and currently she is with the Portsmouth Submarine Memorial Association as their Executive Director. Ms. Violette received an AS in Business and a BS in History from the University of Southern Maine. She also has an MS in Education from Thomas College in Waterville, Maine.

 

Woodman House

Built in 1818 as the residence of Charles and Annie Woodman, The Woodman House today is a unique example of an authentic 20th-century museum. It now houses the Natural History and Veteran Memorial sections and contains extensive and well-preserved collections of local area interest.

The War Memorial Museum The top floor of the Woodman House houses an extensive collection of Civil War artifacts and memorabilia, as well as other collections from wars in which local citizens participated.

Among the many items of interest, one of the ten known “Napoleon” Civil War cannons, complete with its original caisson. Batteries of these guns stopped Pickett’s famous charge at Gettysburg.

Birds & Butterflies The Museum’s first curator, Melville J. Smith, created a series of wonderful dioramas to showcase the Museum’s excellent collection of birds. Shore and land birds in their natural settings and several specimens of Arctic Owls are displayed. An additional room is devoted to dioramas of tropical birds.

Several wall-mounted displays show off a beautiful assortment of jewel-toned moths, butterflies, and insects from nearby locales and the tropics.

Rocks and More Rocks An excellent mineral collection which includes nearly 1300 outstanding specimens. There are hundreds of fossils, collections of area rocks, and displays of dynamic geology.

Native American Artifacts A large display of Native American artifacts includes pieces from the Madbury Culture that lived in this area three to six thousand years ago, as well as the famous Red Paint Culture of nearby Maine. Interesting Incan items from South America are also on display.

Mammals & Marine Life  The museum’s first-floor gallery houses a large display of mammals and marine life with emphasis on the wildlife of New England. Included in the exhibit is a mounted specimen of the last cougar killed in New Hampshire — in nearby Lee in 1853, as well as a 10-foot polar bear killed by a Dover man near the Siberian coast in 1969. If sharks fascinate you, don’t miss the museum’s Marine Room where you can see a blue shark caught off the coast of Ogunquit Maine, or visually feast on a 27-pound lobster, a large green turtle, or a man-killing bivalve clam found off the Australian coast.

Snakes & Turtles A collection of snakes and turtles and a cabinet filled with botanical oddities are also housed in this section.

Childhood Gallery If you’re a doll lover, former or current Boy or Girl Scout, or if you simply want to show your children how kids used to entertain themselves, please visit our childhood room.

Learn more

Woodman Museum

Close