100 Years – 100 Objects – 100 Days: Dr. Jeremy Belknap Items

Table and BooksDr. Jeremy Belknap (1744—1798), Boston native and Harvard graduate, moved to Dover in 1767 to become minister at the Congregational Church. During his 20 year stay at that parish, he wrote the first volume of an eventual 3-volume “History of New Hampshire” (pictured is an 1812 edition), at this mahogany table which still bears ink stains from his pen. He also composed his weekly sermons here. Today, Belknap is credited with authoring the first modern history written by an American and introducing two innovations into historical research: 1.) separating facts from analysis or opinion, and 2.) annotating and crediting his sources. Dr. Belknap is buried in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

This highlighted item from the collection is featured in conjunction with the Woodman Museum’s Centennial Celebration. Each day, for 100 days, Foster’s Daily Democrat spotlights one of the many treasures on view in the Museum. To see each day’s new item, visit the website devoted to this series. This project is made possible with support from Burns, Bryant, Cox, Rockefeller, and Durkin, PA (BBCRD); Dupont’s Service Center; and Tasker Funeral Service.

 

100 Years – 100 Objects – 100 Days: Ash Barrel

Ash BarrelWe take things like soap for granted, but look what our ancestors went through to create it! This large ash barrel was kept outside a colonial garrison because the toxic substance it created, lye, could cause severe burns and eye injuries. Fireplace ashes were dumped in here, then covered with water and slowly boiled. A chemical reaction called saponification would occur and caustic brown lye would trickle out through the holes at the bottom. The lye would then be boiled 6-8 hours with rendered animal fat (lard from pigs, tallow from cattle) to form soft soap. For hard soap, salt was added at the end of the cooking process.

This highlighted item from the collection is featured in conjunction with the Woodman Museum’s Centennial Celebration. Each day, for 100 days, Foster’s Daily Democrat spotlights one of the many treasures on view in the Museum. To see each day’s new item, visit the website devoted to this series. This project is made possible with support from Burns, Bryant, Cox, Rockefeller, and Durkin, PA (BBCRD); Dupont’s Service Center; and Tasker Funeral Service.

Tickets Now on Sale for Centennial Gala

indexHelp us bring the Woodman Museum to all ages and abilities by participating in our Centennial Celebration! This once-in-a-lifetime event, besides being a 100th Anniversary party, is a fundraiser to support our long-range goals to create an accessible Learning Lab where state-of-the-art technology will bring the Wonders of the Woodman Museum to all visitors, including those who may not be able to maneuver to the many upstairs exhibitions in our National Historic Register houses.

We will also be honoring the retirement of Curator Thom Hindle after 40 years at the Woodman Museum!

Tickets are $75 per person, or why not pay “$100 in honor of the 100th Anniversary.” You may also wish to donate to support our long range goals?  The evening’s event includes: a buffet dinner, cash bar, live and recorded entertainment, tours of our four houses, speakers (from the past and present).   Purchase advance tickets here!

The Woodman Museum is grateful to the many sponsors of the Centennial Celebration Gala, including the Benefactor level sponsors: Reylco; D.F. Richard Energy;  and Federal Savings Bank.

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Volunteers Sought for Centennial Celebration


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Do you enjoy discovering interesting things?  Do you like nature,  history, and/or the arts?  As the Woodman Museum is enjoying its biggest season yet – its 100th Season – the museum is looking for community-minded individuals who would like to  help the Woodman celebrate its Centennial!

If you like people, you can do it at the Woodman!  Perhaps you like telling people about interesting things to look at; or maybe you’d just like to hang around great objects with great  stories – we could use all kinds of different help, and would be happy to talk to YOU about being one of our valuable volunteers.

You can volunteer for one four-hour shift a week, or more!  You can train to give tours, or you can staff our gift shop, or you can be a person who answers interesting questions from strangers from all over who want to know more about what Dover and this museum are all about. Or you can volunteer to be a security guard. Or learn for yourself as you help others!

Learn more here.

 

 

On View – Honest Injun: A Native Perspective; Recent Work by George Longfish

George Longfish. Power Glove and Game Boy Meet Kicking Bear on Their Journey Looking for the Yellow Brick Road., 36 x 42The work of Seneca/Tuscorora artist George Longfish are presented in a new exhibition now open at the Keefe House Gallery at the Woodman Museum in Dover, NH.  Honest Injun: A Native Perspective; Recent Work by George Longfish features nearly two dozen recent works. The artist will conduct a gallery talk on Saturday, July 9, 2016 at 1:30 p.m, and the exhibition will run through Sunday, August 7, 2016. The exhibition and the gallery talk are open to the public free of charge.

For more information, click here.

Image: George Longfish, Power Glove and Game Boy Meet Kicking Bear on Their Journey Looking for the Yellow Brick Road, 36″ x 42″

 

Historic Walking Tours – Saturdays 2016

20150530_142214 (2)Discover Dover, NH’s rich history told through stories of its settlers, industrialists, and merchant class while taking part in the 2016 Historic Walking Tours of the city. The tours offer participants an opportunity to explore the historic, social, cultural, and economic development of the area by choosing a physical location in which to explore – the downtown area;  historic homes and architecture; or the Pine Hill Cemetery.  Each tour runs for approximately 90-minutes, offering participants an opportunity to focus on a particular area of interest.

The 2016 Historic Walking Tours run through September, 2016.  The cost for each tour is $10 per person ($15 per person includes one half-price admission pass to the Woodman Museum – valid during the 2016 season), $25 per family of four.  Reservations are suggested, but not required, and can be made by calling (603) 742 – 1038. Walking shoes and water bottles are recommended. For a complete schedule click here.

If you would like to become a volunteer tour guide for Dover’s 2016 Historic Walking Tours, please contact the Woodman Museum at (603)742-1038.

 

 

Become a Member!

Would you like to read more in-depth articles and learn more about the Woodman Museum’s collection, new education programs, and initiatives? Become a member today and receive your copy of “The Woodman,” newsletter, advance notices on upcoming events,  and invitations to special members events.